How Sustainable is wind Power?

How sustainable is wind power?

Of the recent developments in energy production the harnessing of wind power has been quite a divisive one. There are arguments for and against them in what sometimes seems like equal numbers. Some doubt the true effectiveness of current turbine technology. There are environmental concerns too, such as danger to wildlife and some who simply think they ruin natural landscapes. Unfortunately the sites of many wind farms just so happen to be in areas of beautiful nature. Exposed coastlines and hilltops are regularly prime locations when planning where these should occur.

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There are moves to target more offshore locations. However, as construction costs vastly increase away from dry land the scale of these projects is called jeopardised. Firms also face the wrath of the shipping and fishing industries for encroaching on shipping lanes and open waters!

In the UK, for example, there are plans to modernise its electricity supply which would require 15,000 turbines, generating 35 gigawatts (GW) of electricity, on land and at sea. Many experts say it is technically feasible to meet the targets, but there is a growing conviction that the plans were rushed through so quickly by the government that it will now take substantial new money and guarantees to work.

International pressure on governments grows to find cleaner sources of energy for our homes and industries. Are the governments providing enough incentives to technology firms involved? Politicians who ‘talk the talk’ need to ‘walk the walk’. Many are extremely vocal about supporting green energy such as wind power but surely there should be better support far beyond simply advocating their benefits.

In a wind turbine factory on the Isle of Wight in the UK, due to be closed, workers are staging a sit-in and are clearly not getting the support they need! The company’s Danish owner claims there is a lack of demand. They also cited a “lack of political initiatives” and an obstructive planning system.

When technology exists for reducing our reliance on coal, gas and other non-renewable sources, we should give it the funding it deserves. Nurturing the cleanest solutions now can only be beneficial in the long run. It is the only way future developments can occur. Who knows, the wind and water power we consider today will be replaced with less controversial options, but time is of the essence.

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7 Comments

  1. Posted September 3, 2009 at 11:49 pm | Permalink

    Cool site, love the info.

  2. Posted January 11, 2010 at 3:31 am | Permalink

    Hey, I found your blog in a new directory of blogs. I dont know how your blog came up, must have been a typo, anyway cool blog, I bookmarked you. 🙂

    I’m Out! 🙂

  3. Posted January 25, 2011 at 8:54 pm | Permalink

    Rather than subsidizing the consumers purchase, maybe we should focus our gov’t funding and incentives on the technology to produce clean alternative energy sources. It seems a little backwards to me.

  4. Posted April 6, 2011 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    i didn’t understand. website didn’t explan why wind farms are more sustainable!☻☻☻

  5. Hakan
    Posted July 5, 2011 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

    I agree with fred. It doesn’t explain why they are more sustainable. 😦

  6. anony-mouse
    Posted August 14, 2011 at 6:13 am | Permalink

    how sustainable is building the actual turbines? otherwise, thanks very much for an awesome blog 🙂

  7. anony-mouse
    Posted August 14, 2011 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    oh, and cool commenter-logo things 😀


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